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Volume 1

Volume 1

The Vol.1 of Unspoken World Magazine called “The Book of London: Diversity”. In the current issue, we will show you one of the greatest cities in the whole world – London! Selective and hand-picked interviews, interesting stories and articles, professional art photography – this what is waiting for you inside this issue! Unspoken World is a collectible item of 200 thick & high-quality pages, which are waiting for you to be read and looked at!

Contents
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EDITOR’S NOTE

Unspoken World - is an artistic project, where, with the love of photography and of this beautiful world, we would like to bring you closer to new places, show their essence and personality. The magazine covers traditional travel-related topics, but more importantly, we want to pay attention to the details, to the ‘hidden gems’ of the world, to the lives and thoughts of the people who populate our planet. By looking at the details, we believe that we actually get closer to the bigger picture...

THE FIRST WOMAN TO BE A YEOMAN WARDER

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London is a historic castle located on the North bank of the River Thames in central London. Even though not as popular as the guards at Buckingham Palace, the Yeoman Warders (you might have heard of them as Beefeaters) have a charm that conquers thousands of hearts with just a smile. So, who are these guys? Well, we found our #unspoken story here: it was not until exactly 10 years ago that the history of the Tower of London completely changed when Moira Cameron, a woman from Argyll, joined the exclusively male club of Yeoman Warders. Moira started her military career in 1985, at 16 years old. In July 2007, she became the first woman to hold the position of Guardian of the Tower...

DOWN AND UNDER

People have always been attracted to the unknown. Riddles and mysteries, mysticism, if you like: all this is of great interest to everyone. Sometimes the solution of the 100-year-old legend lies on the surface, but more often than not, in the search for answers, one has to dig deeper, right into the very depths of the earth...

#UNSPOKEN ME: NICOLA POZZANI

Trained by Jean Claude Ellena at the Università dell’Immagine of Milan, published by Vogue and niche magazines, Nicola has shared his experiences, including what it’s like to make perfumes for HM the Queen, worldwide. Mesmerised by his creative and inspiring nature, we asked him to share his story one more time for our Unspoken World readers. Why him, you might ask. What brought us to this interview was something he had written in an article. “Fragrance is genderless” - and we were hooked...

THE OLD LADY

The Bank of England is located in an old building in the heart of the City of London, on Threadneedle Street and has been there since 1734. The banking institution itself was opened even earlier, in 1694, to finance the rebuilding of the Royal Navy following a crushing defeat to France during the Nine Years’ War. Upon moving from Walbrook where it was originally located, the bank began acquiring adjacent properties and over time grew to become the juggernaut we know today. As a nod to its venerable age it is referred to in the City as 'the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street’ or simply the "Old Lady". However, some say that the nickname has a much darker origin...

LONDON: QUEEN OF DIVERSITY

In a census dated 2015, it appeared that 36.8% of London's population was foreign-born. Making it one of the most multicultural cities in the world. But the diversity we witness wandering around in London and arising from immigration is relatively new. For centuries, the percentage of "foreigners" in Great Britain remained low: inferior to 2% of the population until the 1930’s and only still about 5% in the early 1980’s. It is really from the 80’s and especially in the last 15 years that the influx of migrants boomed in London and in the British Isles. Nowadays, London is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world, with more than 300 languages spoken within its territory...

FLOUR POWER: SMAINE MALOUMI

Nowadays being a foodie is very much a part of a mainstream popular culture as seen through various forms of media, highlighting the level of interest in culinary affairs. The advent of social media brought with it the proliferation of practically millions of pages dedicated to various forms of food. Last year when the BBC announced that it would remove recipes from its website, 100000 people signed a petition to keep them going. In Central London, a good restaurant is never more than a stone’s throw away and many are perpetually busy, but that is all common knowledge. With the two key focal points for success being food and service, customers interact with the front of house staff, whom they often tip and compliment, while those in the kitchen work their magic. We stepped behind the veil to speak with one of the unsung heroes of this modern revolution and his love affair with cuisine...

BLURRED BORDERS

When you spend enough time in London and get over the sheer scale, size and complexity of this great metropolis, you cannot help but notice not only the diversity of its people but also many reminders of the history that shaped its modern face. For example, although there has been a significant amount of development in recent years in all parts of the city there remain fundamental differences between East and West. As well as having a reputation for being “posh” and “glamorous”, West London is perceived as the most ‘cultured’, ‘cosmopolitan’, ‘pretty’ and ‘prestigious’ part of town. It is very much associated with old money, family dynasties, the middle and classes and to some even a degree of smugness. East London, on the other hand, presents an image of two worlds colliding: the old and the new...

DECODED ART

For a long time, art was not questioned, it was simply appreciated for what it was. However, in recent years, a lot of people seem to be somewhat skeptical towards modern art. Most people do not understand contemporary art and often question the level of skills involved. Perhaps it is because most people are not familiar with the history of mainstream art. Art is the expression of human imagination and creativity which is typically depicted in the form of visuals such as sculptures or paintings. Works of art produced by artists are supposed to be appreciated for their emotional power or beauty. So why is art now so different to the art of the past?..

VCHAIN: THE NEXT LEVEL FOR IDENTITY

VChain is creating a digital identity verification tool for businesses and consumers alike. Imagine if you had each verification of your identity securely stored and logged, whilst not actually giving away the details of your identity to the company doing so – pretty cool, right? Imagine what that could do for the future of you sharing your identity with those that need to verify you: access to banking, credit, utilities, renting, international travel – instantly and seamlessly, without compromising any of your personal details...

EVER GREEN SHRUB OBSESSION

Remember the movie The Goonies? The story of a group of kids who went on a real treasure hunt in their small American town? Remember how happy and amazed they were when they finally found the pirate’s hidden ship full of gold and jewelry? Remember how happy we were too watching it or going at the Pirates attraction in Disney? Well, if you want to be taken back to those magical and historical times where sailing was the greatest adventure, go and visit the Cutty Sark in Greenwich. The Cutty Sark first sailed in 1869 and was a ship that carried tea back to England. It settled in Greenwich in 1922 and has been undergoing renovation since 2007 after a fire. Open to the public, The Cutty Sark is as exciting as the tea it used to transport...

IT’S ALL ABOUT TIME…

What is time if not a mere illusion of perception? Some people even talk about “the future of time”, as if time itself has a past, a present and a future. Time IS. And, from its beginnings, nature and human beings have tried to measure it through different ways. Methods were designed. Theories were invented. Mechanisms were built. Books were written. Lives were lived. And it’s (relatively) still question marked. But what happens when someone creates a musical composition worth of a thousand years? An idea of mathematics translated into a musical piece that wouldn’t stop until the eve of the next millennium...